Force and Motion: Newton's First Law of Motion
Newton's First Law of Motion

Engage

Driving Question: How can Newton's first law of motion be explained?

In your science notebook, write an explanation for the movements occuring with the animation of Newton's Cradle below.

Newtons_cradle_animation.gif

 

Attribution:

Newton's Cradle animation from wikimedia commons 

Explore

Explore what Newton's first law of motion is all about by visiting the website below. Click on the picture to take you there.

 

Newtons_cradle_animation.gif

Attribution:

Newton's Cradle animation from wikimedia commons 

 

Explain

Watch the brainpop on Newton' Laws here.

Modified Open Source Text excerpt

Sir Isaac Newton was a scientist who lived in England (1642-1727) who was interested in the motion of objects under various conditions. He suggested that a stationary object will remain stationary unless a force acts on it and that a moving object will continue moving unless a force slows it down, speeds it up or changes its direction of motion. From this he formulated what is known as Newton's First Law of Motion:

Definition 1: Newton's First Law of Motion

An object will remain in a state of rest or continue travelling at constant velocity, unless acted upon by an unbalanced (net) force.

Let us consider the following situations:

An ice skater pushes herself away from the side of the ice rink and skates across the ice. She will continue to move in a straight line across the ice unless something stops her. Objects are also like that. If we kick a soccer ball across a soccer field, according to Newton's First Law, the soccer ball should keep on moving forever! However, in real life this does not happen. Is Newton's Law wrong? Not really. Newton's First Law applies to situations where there aren't any external forces present. This means that friction is not present. In the case of the ice skater, the friction between the skates and the ice is very little and she will continue moving for quite a distance. In the case of the soccer ball, air resistance (friction between the air and the ball) and friction between the grass and the ball is present and this will slow the ball down.

 

 

 

 

ice skater.gif

soccer animation.gif

 

 

juggling animation.gif

 

View the explanations of Newton's First Law of Motion in the Power Point below.

 

After viewing the video, explain the relationship between force, friction, and inertia in your science notes.

 

In your science notes, write your own example of Newton's First Law of Motion, otherwise known as the Law of Inertia.

 

 

Attributions:

Juggling animation from wikimedia commons

Brainpop video on Newton's Laws of Motion by brainpop from glencoe.mcgrawhill

Text reading modified from everythingscience.co.az (open source)

Ice skater animation from picgifs

Soccer animation from wikimedia commons

Newton's Law Power Point modified from Dr. LaTouche

Newton's Laws of Motion video from United Streaming

Extend

Click on the picture to visit the interactive website on Newton's Laws of Motion. Click on his first law and follow the directions.

Newtons_cradle_animation.gif

Attribution:

Newton's Cradle animation from wikimedia commons 

 

Evaluate

You will create a Prezi based upon all of Newton's 3 Laws of Motion. Now that you have learned about the first law, you can get started. You will be notified how to submit the Prezi by your teacher. For each law, you must

  1. state what the law is
  2. provide your own detailed explanation of the law
  3. create two different illustrations OR provide two pictures of an example of the law

 

Assignment

Submission Required?

Answer the driving question

No, but your teacher may ask to see it

Explanation of how Newton's cradle works

see above

Explain the relationship between force, friction, and inertia

see above

Provide your own example of Newton's First Law

see above

Prezi on Newton's Laws of Motion

Yes, submission required when complete